Oct 31, 2019 • 2 min read

The coastal city packing a serious punch

by Kirsty Tull

Vancouver International Airport (YVR) could be excused for wanting to vaunt their success continuously. The airport winning several notable international best airport awards, including Skytrax's Best North American Airport, based on an independent survey of more than 13.5 million passengers from more than 100 countries.

The coastal city packing a serious punch

Vancouver International Airport (YVR) could be excused for wanting to vaunt their success continuously. The airport winning several notable international best airport awards, including Skytrax’s Best North American Airport, based on an independent survey of more than 13.5 million passengers from more than 100 countries. For this award, they have taken the title, not once, but for a staggering ten consecutive years. The only airport to ever receive this honour, firstly in 2007, then 2010, right through to 2019.

Instead, when you engage with YVR, any form of ostentatious display is far from what you get. Modest does not begin to describe the experience. Their personalised, community-based approach across all of their touch points evokes a sense of knowing and deep understanding – they get you. All beautifully packaged within the communication they deliver, and how they govern themselves as a business – local values with a drive to connect British Columbia to the world.

It gives you a clear depiction for what the ‘locals’ who reside in this stunning coastal city are like – humble, very likable, and crucially authentic.

In their own words, “YVR’s success comes from our unique operating model. As a not-for-profit, community-based organisation, we are not government-run or beholden to shareholders.

Rather, we are committed to our communities, constantly improving the airport for everyone while supporting our region.”

Their public-spirited approach is not disingenuous by any means. In 2018, YVR donated more than $1,000,000 to more than 50 community organisations. Nothing to sneeze at really.

In short, YVR has created an airport that ‘we’ can all be proud of.

After taking over the management of Vancouver International Airport (YVR), the Vancouver Airport Authority commenced work on a redevelopment plan that included the construction of a new international terminal.

The terminal was to include an industry-leading Flight Information Display System that would dramatically enhance the passenger experience.

Speaking with Bruce Allen, Chief Executive Officer of Daifuku Group Affiliate, Intersystems on how they approached the project and how integral this was for YVR’s future development, “YVR recognised Intersystems as an innovator when they selected us back in 1995 and we have enjoyed partnering with ever since. Throughout that time they have remained at the forefront of innovative ideas in airports and our products continue to assist them in delivering a better passenger experience.”

Today, close to 100,000 people travel through YVR each day via fifty-six airlines. In 2018 they welcomed a record 25.9 million passengers.*

Their unique model is one which may set future benchmarks. I, for one, look forward to witnessing what future records they continue to break.

*includes arriving, departing and connecting travellers.

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